The Components Of Dental Implants – How They Work.

A growing number of adults are choosing to replace missing natural teeth with Dental Implants. As the reputation of implants grows, more people are learning that implants are safe, dependable, look and feel natural and are designed to last your lifetime.

Too, Dental Implants have one of the highest implant-in-bone success rates (including that of knees and hip joints). Dental Implants do not decay, will never need a root canal and do not rely on support from neighboring teeth. The most appealing aspect of implants, however, is how they restore your ability to bite and chew comfortably, laugh with confidence and speak without worry.

Dental Implants have been around for decades and have been perfected over the years. There are many types of implants, each designed to accommodate specific needs. A qualified, experienced dentist can determine the type that will work best for you.

In addition to the different types of implants, they come in various shapes and sizes and have different components. Some are placed in unique angles or in various intervals. To understand how implants work, we’ve provided an explanation below.

For example, some implant systems are designed to support non-removable teeth while others may support teeth that are detachable for cleaning. Some implants support one or several teeth while others are designed for placement in minimum bone mass.

•  The ‘implanted’ portions of Dental Implants are actually tooth root replacements. This portion is placed in your jaw bone where it will become secured by the bone growing around it. This process is known as osseo-integration.

•  The process of osseo-integration takes several months. This process can be likened to a tree branch that grows around a rope tied around it for a very long time. Osseo-integration is similar but occurs at a much more rapid pace.

•  After 3-6 months, the implant has become secured by the bone. A post is then inserted into the center of the implant and a replacement tooth (or teeth) is attached to the post. Your new tooth looks, feels and functions like a natural tooth.

•  Keep in mind that the ‘implant’ is not the tooth. The implant is designed to support the post that holds the tooth (referred to as the ‘restoration’). By being placed in the jaw bone, just as a natural tooth root, the implant can support the attached tooth with a firm foundation for optimal stability.

• An implant can support more than one tooth, in most cases. Therefore, is not necessary to place an implant for each missing tooth. One implant is often used to support two or a bridge of teeth. Several strategically-placed implants can support a full arch of teeth.

• Dental Implant treatment costs are largely based on the number of implants placed. When an implant can hold a bridge of teeth or several implants are used to secure a full arch of teeth, this helps to keep overall treatment fees to a minimum.

Regardless of the type of implant placed, it is important to remember that implants do occasionally fail. Night-time clenching or grinding teeth can be a factor. Smoking dries out oral tissues and delays the healing process, which can also contribute to implant failure. Poor oral hygiene routines can also lead to failure. If infection sets in and reaches the implanted portion, the implant may need to be removed to fully resolve the problem.

In our office, we strive to make sure each patient understands their treatment and all options available that coincide with their needs and goals. If you’ve considered Dental Implants, call 586-739-2155 to arrange a free, no obligation consultation.

During this time, we’ll discuss the implant types that are best suited for your needs and goals and anticipated costs. We can also have our Financial Coordinator explain various payment options that are interest-free with no down payment required.

Marijuana Use May Increase Risk For Periodontal Disease

Cannabis or medical marijuana has been said to be a beneficial treatment for pain, seizures and spasms. As its use widens, researchers are finding new ways to utilize this now-legal substance in appropriately prescribed doses.

While there is a debate as to side effects of its use, many researchers feel there is too little data along those lines. For instance, insufficient data exists regarding some claims that cannabis exposure in children and adolescents may cause impaired brain development or lead to mental illness.

However, there are a number of studies showing undesirable side effects when it comes to the oral health of frequent marijuana users. In one, as part of the Centers for Disease Control’s 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, study participants who used cannabis one or more times for at least 12 months had more symptoms of periodontal (gum) disease than other participants. (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170524152634.htm)

This increased propensity for gum disease has also been shown in a long-term study of nearly 1,000 New Zealanders. In that study, people who smoked marijuana for up to 20 years had more gum disease even though other health factors were no worse than those of non-smokers.

For decades, it has been known that the harmful chemicals of cigarette smoke were toxic to the soft tissues of the mouth. A study is also underway to determine the risk factors of e-cigs, or vaping, which users claim is a safer method of smoking. However, the argument has been that chemicals are easily absorbed by the moist tissues in the mouth and, therefore, the potential for detrimental side effects is greater.

Regardless of your use or non-use of cannabis, it is wise to know the signs and symptoms of gum disease. These include tender gums that bleed easily when brushing, receded gums, gums that darken in color from a healthy pink to red, persistent bad breath, and pus pockets that form on gums at the base of some teeth.

Not only is gum disease the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss, the bacteria of periodontal disease has been linked to serious health problems. It has been shown that the infectious bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream and cause inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body.

The inflammatory triggers associated with gum disease bacteria have been linked to heart disease, stroke, memory loss, preterm babies, some cancers, impotency, diabetes and arthritis. As more research is being conducted, a growing number of health problems are showing links to this potent bacteria.

If you have symptoms of gum disease, seek treatment at your earliest convenience. Gum disease only worsens without treatment, resulting in more treatment time and expense. Call 586-739-2155 to schedule.

Afraid Of The Dentist? Tips To Help You Achieve The Smile You Desire!

Fear of dentistry is a common problem, maybe more than most people realize. Some surveys estimate that, worldwide, anywhere from 13% to 24% people struggle with it. In the U.S., an estimated 75% of adults have some level of fear associated with dental visits. Of those, 5 – 10% can be categorized as dental phobics, adults who are so fearful of dentistry that they avoid treatment until pain forces them to seek care.

For most who deal with dental fear, however, it is manageable. Once the individual has found a dentist he or she trusts, many relax. A few other things can help fearful patients get through their dental visits without a white-knuckled grip on the treatment chair. These include:

• Soothing Office Environment: When a dental office doesn’t have a look, feel or smell of a dental office, it can relax anxious patients from the get-go. For example, our Reception Area features a beverage bar and wide screen monitor of beautiful nature videos set to soothing music. We’ve had many patients comment on the relaxing sensation they get from watching and listening to these clips.

• Well-managed Appointments: A long wait in a reception area can cause anxiety to build up. We want your brief wait to be a “catch your breath” opportunity, allowing you to relax. Our goal is to ensure our patients feel they are a priority from arrival through check-out. This is why we are so committed to seeing patients within 10 minutes of their appointed time. In some instances, emergencies or unpredictable situations can cause delays. However, we try to keep the waiting patient informed when this occurs to prevent anxiety from building.

• Relaxing Distractions: When patients listen to music or watch a movie, their focus is often taken off the treatment they’re receiving. For fearful patients, this can help. As you are being seated in the treatment chair, ask about music and video choices. You’ll be pleasantly surprised at our vast inventory of selections!

Dr. Barbat with happy, relaxed patient.

• Good Communication: While some patients prefer to be distracted from what’s taking place in their mouths, others feel more confident knowing each step. Before, during and even after a procedure, we keep patients informed of what we are doing so they feel a sense of control. During this process, we may also use monitors to show images of areas being treated and to explain the treatment’s advantages.

• Oral Sedation: Some patients prefer the added relaxation of Oral Sedation. This deep relaxation aid is in pill form and takes effect even before the patient arrives. Although the patient can walk to the chair and is not ‘officially’ asleep, Oral Sedation does provide a dozing state throughout treatment. Recovery is quick and most people have little or no memory of the procedure after.

• I.V. Sedation (Twilight Sleep): We have certain patients who wish to be “put under” for certain dental procedures. For these, we recommend I.V. Sedation, or “twilight sleep.” This is a deeper sleep-state of sedation that is administered in the vein by a trained professional. As patients snooze, the procedure is completed while they are carefully monitored by trained staff and safety equipment throughout (as with Oral Sedation as well). I.V. Sedation typically erases all memory of the procedure after but does require more recovery time than for Oral Sedation.

• Committed Team: Our entire office – from the administrative team to the clinical staff to the doctors who administer your procedures – are all ONE when it comes to creating a welcoming, respectful and compassionate environment for patients, especially those who have dental fears. We understand that these fears may be the result of an unfortunate experience in another dental office. However, some people cannot pinpoint why these fears exist, they just know they are there.

Our unified goal is to have patients smiling as they enter our front door and smiling as they leave. We know that, even for patients who have dental fears, your dental visit can be a positive experience. We also know, however, that we must first get you in the door so you can experience that!

Begin with a friendly conversation with our phone staff by calling 586-739-2155. Then, ask for a no-cost, no obligation consultation. During this, we’ll relax in comfy chairs in a private consultation room that is removed from the clinical side of the office. You can share your concerns and ask questions, which I’ll answer thoroughly.

If you’re too uneasy about coming in for a consultation, ask for a phone consultation. We can discuss your needs over the phone and you can determine when a personal visit is the next step. If you like, we can also put you in touch with several patients who, like you, once had dental fears and now enjoy healthy smiles. Hearing from someone who has ‘been there, done that’ can often help.

Don’t let imagined complications keep you from achieving the smile you desire. Imagine your life with a healthy, attractive smile. With our help, we believe you can achieve your goal while getting dental fears behind you!