Improve Your Smile. Porcelain Veneers Can Make A Beautiful Difference!

In about anything these days, what defines ‘quality’ and enhances longevity begins with the material — from clothing to tires to furniture and on and on, your investment in the very best pays off by giving the results you most desire.

When it comes to cosmetic dentistry, the materials used and the skills of the dentist are significant components of getting the most from your investment. Most of us have seen people who have had obvious dental work – NEVER the goal! In cosmetic dentistry, the goal is to create a beautiful smile that looks like you were born with!

Smile enhancement typically focuses on the front 6 – 10 teeth most visible in a full smile. These are the teeth you want to have the most natural look and feel possible in shape, shade, opalescence (the way light is reflected) and luminosity (the opaqueness).

In most cases, we use porcelain veneers to re-create appealing smiles that are balanced to facial features. Porcelain is the closest thing in durability and appearance to natural teeth and provides the best longevity of all dental materials. Additionally, porcelain resists staining better than other materials.

When replacing fillings, porcelain can be also be used for inlays or onlays to give the most natural appearance. When laughing, for example, using porcelain means the ‘tops’ of teeth won’t reveal signs of dental work. It can be precisely shade-matched to blend into existing teeth and, again, with excellent durability.

Yet, we all know even the best materials can disappoint when applied by substandard skills or inexperienced hands. For example, investing in a beautiful cashmere coat can be a waste of exquisite material if cheap thread is used and the workmanship is shoddy.

Choosing the right cosmetic dentist for you begins with a consultation appointment. During this time, you can ask questions, such as:

• What advanced training have you had that qualifies you in cosmetic dentistry?

• How will you check my bite after this treatment to ensure a proper fit?

• How do you select the dental lab who creates the veneers (or other ‘restorations’)?

• How long have you been in dentistry and what do you do to fine-tune your skills as new techniques and materials come available?

Also, visit the dentist’s web site Smile Gallery to see some examples of before-&-after’s. Look for patient quotes on the site to see if their words are reassuring to you personally.

Patient of Dr. Ban Barbat

When visiting the dentist’s office, look to see if he or she has displayed examples of their work, either in framed photography of actual patients or in albums in the reception or consultation rooms. A dentist who is skilled and experienced is confident showcasing her work!

Porcelain veneers will give you a beautiful result, if in the right hands. Your new smile should make you FEEL wonderful and inspired to share it often! An attractive smile should also get complimented by others, even strangers! That’s a terrific feeling and a sure sign that your investment was a wise one!

Discuss your smile during a free consultation. Call 586-739-2155 to arrange a time when we can sit together and determine what may be best for you.

While you’re here, we can also have our Financial Coordinator explain easy payment plans that can help you make affordable, monthly payments while enjoying your fabulous, new smile!

 

Dentures That Slip? Why The Problem Will Continue.

I’ve heard many descriptions when it comes to patients describing denture movement. Terms like wobbly, slippery, and rocky are how people tell me about trying to eat or speak with an ill-fitting denture.

Quite frankly, the problem has less to do with the denture and more to do with what it sits on.

Dentures are designed to hold replacement teeth using a gum-colored base that sits on the ‘arch’ where your natural tooth roots were once held. This arch is actually the upper or lower jaw bone, covered over with gum tissue.

When your tooth roots were present in the jaw, they kept the bone stimulated. This stimulation enabled the bone to maintain its mass, so it stayed at a healthy height and depth. Once the tooth roots were removed, however, the lack of stimulation caused the bone to shrink.

The term for bone loss from this process is known as ‘resorption.’ Resorption is actually a slow process, so it is not obvious when it first begins. Think of it like a small leak in a basketball. At first, the ball continues to bounce fine. Over time, the leak shows up and, eventually, it is an obstacle to using the ball as it is intended.

When your denture was first made, it was made to conform to the existing height and width of the arch, or ‘ridge.’ Once resorption became obvious, however, it was probably while eating.

Biting and chewing require stability of teeth. An arch that is shrinking in size no longer conforms to the contours for which a denture is originally made. Initially, using more denture adhesive or paste may help. Over time, though, movement is more than likely an obvious problem when eating.

Because bone loss creates movement when eating, long-time denture wearers often adjust their diets to soft foods that dissolve easily in the mouth. This not only limits the variety of fresh, fibrous foods necessary for good nutrition, digestion is also compromised. It is a fact that people who wear dentures have more gastrointestinal problems than those who have their own teeth.

While uncomfortable movement when eating is a challenge, fear of embarrassing slips or clicks also causes some denture wearers to decline social invitations that include meals or gatherings around food. Research has shown that staying socially involved is a healthy part of aging.

In one study published by the Center For Advancing Health, older adults who stayed actively engaged on a social level developed cognitive and physical limitations more slowly than did those with low levels of engagement. (http://www.cfah.org/hbns/2011/socially-active-older-adults-have-slower-rates-of-health-declines)

When the jaw bone shrinks, it affects more than just the fit of your dentures. A shrinking jaw causes changes to your facial appearance, including the formation of jowls as facial muscles detach from the declining bone mass.

Deep wrinkles form around the mouth as the jaw bone resorbs and the chin becomes more pointed. While a denture plumps up the face when in place, the extent of bone loss may be more obvious by looking in the mirror without the denture.

While we want to provide each patient with the tooth replacement choice that best suits their needs, a denture that is “wobbly” will remain a problem. Relines can help, but as the bone loss continues to flatten out the arch, the denture will start to move again.

We recommend dental implants so highly because they halt the rate of bone loss by recreating stimulation to the bone. Additionally, implants are held by the jaw bone, just as your natural tooth roots once were. This restores a stable foundation for biting and chewing, speaking and laughing.

There are many different types of implants designed for various needs. Some are designed to be positioned in minimal bone depth. For others, bone rebuilding procedures may be needed (or desired) to restore the bone to a healthy mass.

Eating, laughing, feeling confident socially and even sneezing should not be overshadowed with discomfort or fear of embarrassment. Let’s discuss your options and associated costs for dental implants during a free consultation appointment.

Afterward, we can also have our Financial Coordinator discuss payment options with you. Some require no down payment and are interest-free. You could be making easy, monthly payments while feeling confident and comfortable as you chew an apple or laugh with friends!

Call 586-739-2155 to schedule a time.