Category Archives: arthritis

Marijuana Use May Increase Risk For Periodontal Disease

Cannabis or medical marijuana has been said to be a beneficial treatment for pain, seizures and spasms. As its use widens, researchers are finding new ways to utilize this now-legal substance in appropriately prescribed doses.

While there is a debate as to side effects of its use, many researchers feel there is too little data along those lines. For instance, insufficient data exists regarding some claims that cannabis exposure in children and adolescents may cause impaired brain development or lead to mental illness.

However, there are a number of studies showing undesirable side effects when it comes to the oral health of frequent marijuana users. In one, as part of the Centers for Disease Control’s 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, study participants who used cannabis one or more times for at least 12 months had more symptoms of periodontal (gum) disease than other participants. (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170524152634.htm)

This increased propensity for gum disease has also been shown in a long-term study of nearly 1,000 New Zealanders. In that study, people who smoked marijuana for up to 20 years had more gum disease even though other health factors were no worse than those of non-smokers.

For decades, it has been known that the harmful chemicals of cigarette smoke were toxic to the soft tissues of the mouth. A study is also underway to determine the risk factors of e-cigs, or vaping, which users claim is a safer method of smoking. However, the argument has been that chemicals are easily absorbed by the moist tissues in the mouth and, therefore, the potential for detrimental side effects is greater.

Regardless of your use or non-use of cannabis, it is wise to know the signs and symptoms of gum disease. These include tender gums that bleed easily when brushing, receded gums, gums that darken in color from a healthy pink to red, persistent bad breath, and pus pockets that form on gums at the base of some teeth.

Not only is gum disease the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss, the bacteria of periodontal disease has been linked to serious health problems. It has been shown that the infectious bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream and cause inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body.

The inflammatory triggers associated with gum disease bacteria have been linked to heart disease, stroke, memory loss, preterm babies, some cancers, impotency, diabetes and arthritis. As more research is being conducted, a growing number of health problems are showing links to this potent bacteria.

If you have symptoms of gum disease, seek treatment at your earliest convenience. Gum disease only worsens without treatment, resulting in more treatment time and expense. Call 586-739-2155 to schedule.

Links Between Gum Disease & Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

For years, researchers have found that the inflammation caused by the infectious bacteria of periodontal (gum) disease can trigger inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body. Studies have shown that this potent oral bacteria correlates to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, arthritis, some cancers and preterm babies.

With these serious health risks, men, in particular, should be made aware of another. Researchers have given a closer assessment to recent studies and found that erectile dysfunction (a condition causing difficulty having or maintaining an erection) is more common in men with gum disease.

One article published by Reuters.com reveals that reviewers analyzed data from five studies published between 2009 and 2014. The combined studies included 213,000 male participants between the ages of 20 and 80, according to a report in the International Journal of Impotence Research.

In every study, men who had chronic periodontitis (advanced gum disease) were more likely to have erectile dysfunction, especially males younger than 40 and older than 59. The article stated, “After accounting for diabetes, which can influence both gum disease and sexual function, erectile dysfunction was 2.28 times more common for men with periodontitis than for men without it.” (http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-periodontitis-erectile-dysfunc-idUSKBN13K1UP)

In the U.S., an estimated 18 percent of males have erectile dysfunction. Men over the age of 70 are more likely to have ED compared to 5 percent between the ages of 20 and 40.

However, the men who are most affected by ED are getting younger. One outpatient clinic showed that one in four men who sought help for erectile dysfunction were under the age of 40.

Could a healthy mouth lower the risk of ED? In a 2013 study, it was found that treating periodontal disease improves ED symptoms. Thus, a growing number of physicians are advising male patients who have both ED and periodontitis to seek periodontal treatment as a way to reduce its risk.

Researchers are learning much about the hazards of chronic inflammation in our bodies. As an inflammatory disease, periodontal disease has come under closer scrutiny as a potential trigger for other serious health problems. For example, nearly half of the men with ED in one study also had diabetes, another chronic inflammatory disease with links to periodontal disease.

Although many serious health problems are linked to oral bacteria, gum disease is one of the most preventable of all. Twice daily brushing, daily flossing, a diet limited in sugar and carbohydrates and drinking plenty of water are simple guidelines to follow. Yet, it is estimated that over 47% of American adults have some level of gum disease.

For the good of your overall health and well-being, renew your commitment to a healthy smile. Begin with a thorough examination. We’ll discuss how to get your oral health in good shape and ways to maintain it between dental check-ups.

Call 586-739-2155 to schedule or ask to begin with a free consultation.

 

 

 

 

Vitamin C And Your Smile

I have always been health conscious and committed to a balanced diet. However, there was no other period in my life that I was more focused on what I put into my body than during my pregnancies,. Like most moms-to-be, I was very careful about my food choices and took a pre-natal vitamin to supplement what my diet may have lacked.

Today’s busy adults are not always diligent about eating a healthy diet that provides adequate fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals. Many eat too fast, not chewing our food properly for the digestive process to begin. Too, most of us do not drink enough water.

To supplement what we may not get in our diets, many adults take a multi-vitamin.  While vitamins bolster your overall health by making sure you’re getting the elements you need, remember that your smile needs an ample supply as well.

According to the Journal of Periodontology, consuming at least 180 mgs of vitamin C a day gives your gums and teeth a healthy boost. Vitamin C is an anti-inflammatory that uses collagen to bind cells to build connective tissues – beneficial to gum tissues. Vitamin C has even been shown to increase bone regrowth, helping to restore healthy teeth.

Want to get your C the natural way? Good sources of vitamin C are coconut water, citrus fruits, broccoli, red peppers, brussel sprouts and tomatoes.

If you aren’t getting sufficient vitamin C through your diet, look for non-acidic alternatives available over-the-counter. These forms of vitamin C come in powder or chewing gum. We prefer you avoid most chewable vitamin C products, however, since they can be highly acidic. This level of acidity can damage tooth enamel, leaving you susceptible to decay.

Keeping your gums healthy is not only necessary for maintaining good oral health. Studies now show that the bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream through tears in gum tissues. As it travels throughout the body, it can trigger inflammatory reactions. This has been linked to heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, some cancers, preterm babies, diabetes, arthritis and impotency.

Signs of gum disease are tender gums that bleed when brushing, swollen gums, gums that deepen in color, receded gums and persistent bad breath. Gum disease will only worsen without treatment and is the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss.

Keeping your mouth healthy means you enjoy fresher breath and helps you avoid periodontal (gum) disease and cavities. In addition to a healthy, balanced diet and vitamin supplements, your 6-month dental cleanings and exams give you added support.

If you have symptoms of gum disease, call promptly so treatment can be scheduled without delay. Or, if you haven’t had regular dental cleanings, call 586-739-2155 to schedule.

Gentle Dental Care + Sedation = Confident Smiles!

If going to the dentist invokes feelings of anxiety, nervousness or fear, you are in good company. Over 70% of American adults are estimated to have some level of fear or anxiety associated with dental visits.

For many adults, this keeps them from having regular dental care. And, it’s the regular cleanings and exams that help to prevent problems in the first place. Because fear holds many people back from having these appointments, their needs become gradually more complex as a result. As a matter of fact, many high-fear adults only see a dentist when a problem becomes so painful they are forced to set their fears aside to achieve pain relief.

As far as who has dental fear, it certainly doesn’t discriminate. With fearful adults, there is no typical age group, income level, or gender and it effects all ethnic groups.

As a dentist who has built a reputation for a gentle touch, I see a number of patients who come from a wide vicinity because of their fear issues. Sadly, by the time they arrive, many high-fear patients have already lost natural teeth and are at risk of losing more. A large percentage have some level of periodontal (gum) disease.

In addition to being the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss, the bacteria of gum disease has been found to trigger inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body. This infectious bacteria has been associated with heart disease, stroke, some cancers, arthritis, diabetes, impotency, preterm babies and more. This greatly amplifies the need for good oral health.

In addition to providing respectful care with a gentle touch, we offer Oral Sedation or I.V. Sedation (twilight sleep) in addition to our standard relaxation features . We also pace your care according to what is comfortable for you. Patients tend to relax when they realize they are in charge of what is done at each appointment and how frequently those appointments occur.

No matter how you would categorize your anxiety when it comes to dental care, we know you can overcome these challenges and achieve a healthy mouth and confident smile. Many of our formerly-fearful patients have even overcome their dread of dental care altogether. We love seeing these patients walk in with a smile and leave smiling – and knowing that they love sharing their smile often!

Begin by calling 1-866-9-Smiles to arrange a no-charge Consultation. This is a discussion that takes place in a private, living-room style setting that is removed from the clinical side of the office. During this time, we’ll discuss your concerns and how we can help you move at a pace that’s right for you.

Let your smile be a beautiful reflection of who you are, inside and out! We’ll help you convert your fear of dental visits to the terrific smile you desire.

To Floss Or Not?

When it comes to removing debris and bacteria in the mouth, brushing your teeth doesn’t always do the job. This is where flossing can give your oral health a ‘leg up.’

Flossing removes food particles caught between teeth that a tooth brush cannot reach or dislodge.

When you eat food, an acid enters the mouth through saliva flow. As the initial stage of digestion, this acid is designed to break food down as it’s chewed.

Although beneficial to the digestive process, this acid is potent. It is so strong that it can soften tooth enamel. This is why it is wise to delay brushing for 20 to 30 minutes after eating. The abrasive nature of a toothbrush and toothpaste can wear away precious tooth enamel while in this softened state.

Food needs to be removed before it starts to rot. Food particles that remain in the mouth allow oral bacteria to thrive. As bacteria eat, they reproduce – rapidly. How rapidly? The sticky film you feel on teeth in the evening is actually a coating of oral bacteria that has accumulated since your morning brushing.

Known as plaque, this film coats the teeth, tongue and gums. When not removed daily, plaque can form into rock-hard bacterial masses that attach to teeth. This is referred to as calculus (or tartar) and is what your hygienist scrapes off teeth during dental cleanings. Once formed, it cannot be brushed or flossed away.

This is why it is important to keep oral bacteria levels to a minimum. The devotion of twice daily brushing and daily flossing helps you avoid problems such as cavities and gum disease.

For decades, brushing and flossing have been the tried-&-true techniques for maintaining a healthy mouth. However, like most things, proper techniques can mean the difference between somewhat helpful and very effective.

Brushing should be done with a soft to medium bristle tooth brush using a fluoridated toothpaste. You should use a circulation motion on the front and back of each tooth and a swirling motion along the tops.

Flossing also requires the proper technique to have a positive impact. For example, researchers at the University of Washington School of Dentistry found that when children between ages 4 – 13 had their teeth professionally flossed for five days a week for just over a year and a half, there was 40% decrease in cavity risk. A group of the same ages who flossed on their own saw no such benefit.

Yet, many people feel flossing is awkward. They claim it cuts circulation in their fingers and it’s difficult to reach certain areas in the mouth. For people with large fingers, this seems to be a significant obstacle. Too, people who have dexterity problems, such as arthritic challenges, feel frustrated by the movement required.

For easy flossing tips, watch our short video: http://www.banrbarbatdds.com/dental_care.php

For situations where self-flossing is too challenging, we often recommend water flossers. These are easy to use, affordable and can be more effective than flossing when challenges exist.

In spite of daily flossing and twice daily brushing, other factors can impact your potential for a healthy mouth. As mentioned prior, each time you eat, the acid attack in your mouth places tooth enamel in a vulnerable position. For those who are frequent snackers, they are more susceptible to oral problems due to an increased number of acid attacks throughout the day.

People who sip sodas during the day also have a greater risk. The acid in the soda coupled with the drink’s sticky sugar is a double wallop when it mixes with the acid in the mouth. Often, people drink sodas between meals, which means the mouth is being bombarded by acid far too often to ward off potential damage.

If people who have lost teeth due to insufficient oral hygiene could go back, daily brushing and flossing would take on a much higher priority in their day. Adult teeth are a ‘one-&-done’ deal. Losing them opens the door for decisions that can be costly and even frustrating (just ask most long-time denture wearers!).

If you can’t get comfortable with flossing, consider purchasing  a water flosser and make it part of your everyday oral hygiene routine. In addition to reducing your risk for cavities and gum disease, you’ll be able to enjoy fresher breath and a more confident smile.

Behind on your dental cleanings and check-ups? Let’s get you up to speed before the year’s end. Call 1-866-9-Smiles to schedule an appointment.

Diabetic? Improve Your Health With A Healthy Smile!

Diabetes is defined as “a disorder of the metabolism causing excessive thirst and the production of large amounts of urine.” It is a metabolic disease characterized by the body’s inability to properly secrete or manage insulin. This results in abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Diabetes is a leading cause of death due to vascular complications attributed to the disease.

The prevalence of diabetes has increased dramatically over the past few decades and is expected to triple in the next decade. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared diabetes to be at a pandemic level. A report published by the U.S. National Library of Medicine through the National Institutes of Health states that diabetes is “a growing public health concern and a common chronic metabolic disease worldwide.” 

The most common types of diabetes are type 1 (insulin dependent) and type 2 (non-insulin-dependent). According to the American Diabetes Association, the majority of diabetics suffer from Type 2 diabetes with initial symptoms emerging after age 45. Early indications of this disease are bad breath and bleeding gums.

For those in the medical and scientific field, seeing early signs of diabetes in the form of oral problems is typical even though the general public rarely associates one with the other. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory condition that can trigger inflammation elsewhere in the body. Other inflammatory diseases (such as high blood pressure, arthritis, and coronary artery disease) have been linked to gum disease by numerous research studies.

Not only is periodontal disease said to be the 6th greatest complication of diabetes, research has shown that one tends to trigger the other. Gum disease has been found to occur more frequently and with greater severity in diabetics with poor glycaemic control. Proper management of diabetes for controlled glucose levels has been shown to be helpful in preventing or treating periodontal disease.

Symptoms of gum disease include gums that bleed when brushing, frequent bad breath, gum recession that expose dark tooth root sections) and tender and swollen gums. As gum disease progresses, gums will turn red in color, pus pockets will form at the base of teeth and teeth will loosen. Eventually teeth will need removing.

While it is important for all to be aware of  the signs or gum disease, diabetics, especially, should be as proactive as possible when it comes to their oral health due to their  particular vulnerability to inflammation in the body. For our patients who have diabetes, we advise having a dental check-up every 3-4 months.

If you have diabetes, please arrange a periodontal examination at your earliest convenience. Gum disease will only worsen without treatment. And remember, gum disease is the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss.

Delayed care often results in more treatment time and greater expense. Call toll free 1-866-9-Smiles if you have questions or to begin with a free Consultation to discuss your symptoms and oral health.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Has Similarities To Gum Disease

Gum disease is the leading cause of adult tooth loss in the U.S.  As devastating as that is, it can be even worse.

In the mouth, early stage periodontal (gum) disease causes gums to bleed when brushing, bad breath and gum tenderness. As the disease progresses, gums turn red and pus pockets form at the base of some teeth. As the infectious bacteria attack the bone structures that support tooth roots, teeth will begin to loosen and may need removing.

From decades of research, a link has been found between the bacteria of gum disease and many serious health problems. The infectious bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream through diseased gum tissues, causing inflammatory triggers. This inflammation has been linked to heart disease, stroke, memory loss, preterm babies, diabetes and impotency.

For people who have rheumatoid arthritis (RA), many are learning that research is noting close connections with arthritis and gum disease, too. Apparently,  gum disease and RA share a genetic similarity. The clinical makeup shows similar structures, primarily in pathogens that spark disease or illness. Research has found that the pathological process that occurs in both gum disease and RA are nearly identical.

Both conditions cause chronic inflammation in tissues that connect to bone with both diseases having a similar inflammatory trigger. Even more similar is the particular species of bacteria found in periodontally-diseased tissues when compared with tissues around  arthritic joints. In one study, a particular pathogen associated with periodontal disease was found to activate the same destructive process of rheumatoid arthritis.

RA is a debilitating, painful disease that destroys joints. RA often emerges gradually, initially causing morning stiffness and weak, sore muscles. As inflammation from RA worsens, joints become swollen.  Joints become achy and stiff most often in the fingers, wrists, elbows, hips, knees, ankles, toes and neck. Unfortunately, there is no cure for RA.

On a positive note, studies have shown that treating periodontal disease in RA patients helps to improve RA symptoms. This is felt to occur because of a lighter burden of oral inflammation to the system.

These findings reinforce how oral health correlates closely to our overall health. When you consider how the presence of gum disease can significantly increase your risk for serious health conditions, having good oral health should be a priority for every American. Sadly, statistics show that almost 75% of the U.S. adult population have some level of gum disease.

Recommit yourself to thorough oral hygiene at home and keeping those 6-month check-ups and cleanings. If you have signs of gum disease, have treatment at your earliest convenience. Gum disease will only worsen and requires more treatment time and expense as it progresses.

Call toll free 1-866-9-Smiles to schedule a free consultation.

Research Reveals Oral Health Links To Deadly Diseases

4.1.1We occasionally see patients who have been advised by their surgeons to have their gum health checked prior to surgery. This proactive measure is to reduce risk factors that could complicate surgical outcome. But, what does your smile have to do with a hip joint replacement? Or, any surgery for that matter?

Although the connection between healthy gums and surgery elsewhere in the body seem unrelated, research has shown otherwise. For decades, numerous studies have shown correlations between the bacteria of periodontal (gum) disease and health problems elsewhere in the body, some deadly.

Periodontal (gum) disease is an infection that destroys gum tissues and the structures that support teeth. As gum tissues are attacked and weakened, the bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream through tears in diseased tissues.

This infectious bacteria has been found to trigger inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body. Systemic inflammation is the now-known epicenter of a number of major health problems, including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, arthritis, impotency and more.

Studies have also shown that pregnant women with periodontal disease have a greater risk of having pre-term and low birth weight babies. These indications have been found in amniotic fluid and in fetal cord blood samples of infants.

The latest research reveals that the bacteria of periodontal disease may contribute to a higher risk of pancreatic cancer. For years, researchers at the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society have conducted a cancer prevention and screening study.

By studying oral samples, notably higher levels of two types of oral bacteria were measured in study participants with pancreatic cancer. One oral bacteria was found to create a 50% increased risk for pancreatic cancer and the second oral bacteria led to a 59% greater likelihood.

For decades, it was perceived that RA (rheumatoid arthritis) patients had such a high risk of gum disease due to poor oral hygiene because of dexterity problems with using a toothbrush. However, more recent studies now show that gum disease is actually a risk factor for arthritis.

While genetic factors certainly contribute to greater RA susceptibility, the true source has been determined to be inflammatory reactions. This inflammation is triggered primarily by bacterial infections, with oral bacteria being a significant contributor to inflammatory arthritis.

Based on years of studies and findings, the correlation between gum disease bacteria and our whole-health is finally coming to light. As research continues to pinpoint the origins of how the infectious bacteria of gum disease set in motion pancreatic cancer’s onset, new screening methods can hopefully be developed.

In the meantime, there is no debate that having and keeping good oral health is important. Fortunately, this is easy and takes just minutes a day. Follow a thorough oral hygiene regimen at home by brushing twice a day (two minutes each time) and floss daily. Have dental cleanings every six months and follow your dental hygienist’s recommendations to keep oral bacteria at minimal levels between visits.

If you have symptoms of gum disease, please be seen promptly. These include tender gums that bleed easily when brushing, frequent bad breath, swollen and tender gums and gums that deepen in color from a healthy pink. Remember, gum disease will only worsen without treatment and is the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss.

Begin with a free consultation by calling toll free 1-866-9-Smiles.

How To Spend Less On Dentistry

Like most individuals, our desire is to be proactive with our family’s health. To accomplish this, we stay active, eat healthy and have regular check-ups along with periodic screenings. It simply makes sense to be committed to preventing problems or catch any that do arise at early stages.

Research has shown that your oral health deserves the same commitment you give to maintaining a healthy body. Studies have found links between the bacteria of periodontal (gum) disease and serious problems elsewhere in the body. These include heart disease, stroke, diabetes, arthritis, preterm babies,  impotency and more.

Another reason to maintain a healthy smile is to save money. Yes, by devoting mere minutes a day to your oral hygiene and having dental exams and cleanings every six months, you can prevent many problems from occurring in the first place, saving both time and expense for repairs.MagGlass

Your twice-a-year dental check-ups are opportunities to remove calculus. Calculus (or ‘tartar’), a hardened form of oral bacteria, is the result of plaque that is not removed thoroughly from the mouth each day. Once plaque forms into calculus, it attaches to teeth and can no longer be brushed or flossed away.

Oral bacteria thrive and reproduce in your mouth by eating away at gum tissues. Because they reproduce rapidly, they can easily go from gingivitis (an early stage of gum disease) to periodontal disease, an infection. While gingivitis causes tender gums to bleed when brushing, periodontal disease symptoms are more severe, including persistent bad breath, sore gums that bleed easily, gums that darken in color, receded gums, and pus pockets that form between teeth.

Gum disease is the leading cause of adult tooth loss in the U.S.  However, the potent bacteria can become bloodborne through tears in disease gum tissues, causing problems elsewhere in the body. The bacteria of periodontal disease has been shown to trigger inflammatory reactions that are the origins of the major health problems mentioned prior. And, as research continues, more and more problems are being connected to oral bacteria from gum disease.

Obviously, oral bacteria is highly potent. However, it’s easy to control with twice daily brushing and daily flossing combined with regular dental checkups. For added protection, limit sugary snacks and either swish after eating or chew sugarless gum when brushing is inconvenient. Not only will you help to reduce your risk for cavities and gum problems, you’ll be able to enjoy fresher breath and smiling confidence.

Think about the savings you’ll experience when you don’t need cavities repaired and can avoid gum therapy required to remove deeply-embedded oral bacteria. Begin with a thorough examination and cleaning. This will help to give your mouth a clean slate that will be easy to maintain at home between visits.

To schedule, call 1-866-9-Smiles. We look forward to helping you save money!

Oral Health Connections Reach Far Beyond The Mouth

Having a clean, healthy mouth is a good way to have fresh breath, avoid cavities and prevent periodontal (gum) disease. But, did you know that the health of your mouth can affect your health in other parts of your body?

Over the years, numerous studies and much research has been conducted to pinpoint the true origins of diseases such as coronary artery disease, diabetes and others. While there is still much to be known, what has emerged time and again as the culprit has been inflammation.

Inflammation in the body has been determined to cause triggers that become the onset of a wide variety of health problems. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease. This means that the bacteria that are attacking your tooth enamel and gum tissues will run rampant on a consistent basis. As destructive as these bacteria are to your mouth, they can also have damaging potential elsewhere.

When the bacteria of gum disease enter the bloodstream (through tears in weakened gum tissues), it can create inflammatory triggers. This, in turn, results in higher risks for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, preterm babies, arthritis, respiratory diseases and even impotency. By why?

First, let me clarify that not all inflammation is bad. For example, when you cut your finger, the body sends antibodies to help repair the cut. The redness or slight swelling you see as the cut heals is a sign that the body’s defense system is fighting off bacteria that could create infection.

In chronic inflammation, however, the body’s defense mechanism becomes locked in the ‘on’ position. This sets into motion a chain of reactions that turn what was designed to be a positive response into a negative one. An area in the body that stays in the inflamed mode is at risk for dysfunctional reactions.

While the bacteria of gum disease seem a long distance from arthritic joints, the association – according to research – boils down to inflammation.  Think of it this way, if you have pink eye, the condition can be easily transferred from one person to another through touch. So, if oral bacteria of gum disease enter the bloodstream and pass through the heart, it makes sense that the inflammatory reactions  of the bacteria can trigger inflammatory reactions here, too.

An attractive, confident smile is important. However, it’s important, also, that you consider the overall health of your mouth — teeth AND gums — as being vital elements of a smile’s well-being. Keeping a clean, healthy mouth can enhance your overall  health and help you avoid (or greatly lower) the risk for severe and even deadly diseases.

If you feel your mouth needs a ‘clean slate’ so you can maintain a healthy smile, call toll free 1-866-9-Smiles to schedule an exam. Or, consider beginning with a free consultation to discuss your needs and goals.

And, if dental fear has kept you from the care you need, feel free to mention your concerns. We are especially sensitive to those with these fears and take a number of measures to ensure your comfort at all times.