Category Archives: Receded Gums

Marijuana Use May Increase Risk For Periodontal Disease

Cannabis or medical marijuana has been said to be a beneficial treatment for pain, seizures and spasms. As its use widens, researchers are finding new ways to utilize this now-legal substance in appropriately prescribed doses.

While there is a debate as to side effects of its use, many researchers feel there is too little data along those lines. For instance, insufficient data exists regarding some claims that cannabis exposure in children and adolescents may cause impaired brain development or lead to mental illness.

However, there are a number of studies showing undesirable side effects when it comes to the oral health of frequent marijuana users. In one, as part of the Centers for Disease Control’s 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, study participants who used cannabis one or more times for at least 12 months had more symptoms of periodontal (gum) disease than other participants. (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170524152634.htm)

This increased propensity for gum disease has also been shown in a long-term study of nearly 1,000 New Zealanders. In that study, people who smoked marijuana for up to 20 years had more gum disease even though other health factors were no worse than those of non-smokers.

For decades, it has been known that the harmful chemicals of cigarette smoke were toxic to the soft tissues of the mouth. A study is also underway to determine the risk factors of e-cigs, or vaping, which users claim is a safer method of smoking. However, the argument has been that chemicals are easily absorbed by the moist tissues in the mouth and, therefore, the potential for detrimental side effects is greater.

Regardless of your use or non-use of cannabis, it is wise to know the signs and symptoms of gum disease. These include tender gums that bleed easily when brushing, receded gums, gums that darken in color from a healthy pink to red, persistent bad breath, and pus pockets that form on gums at the base of some teeth.

Not only is gum disease the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss, the bacteria of periodontal disease has been linked to serious health problems. It has been shown that the infectious bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream and cause inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body.

The inflammatory triggers associated with gum disease bacteria have been linked to heart disease, stroke, memory loss, preterm babies, some cancers, impotency, diabetes and arthritis. As more research is being conducted, a growing number of health problems are showing links to this potent bacteria.

If you have symptoms of gum disease, seek treatment at your earliest convenience. Gum disease only worsens without treatment, resulting in more treatment time and expense. Call 586-739-2155 to schedule.

Vitamin C And Your Smile

I have always been health conscious and committed to a balanced diet. However, there was no other period in my life that I was more focused on what I put into my body than during my pregnancies,. Like most moms-to-be, I was very careful about my food choices and took a pre-natal vitamin to supplement what my diet may have lacked.

Today’s busy adults are not always diligent about eating a healthy diet that provides adequate fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals. Many eat too fast, not chewing our food properly for the digestive process to begin. Too, most of us do not drink enough water.

To supplement what we may not get in our diets, many adults take a multi-vitamin.  While vitamins bolster your overall health by making sure you’re getting the elements you need, remember that your smile needs an ample supply as well.

According to the Journal of Periodontology, consuming at least 180 mgs of vitamin C a day gives your gums and teeth a healthy boost. Vitamin C is an anti-inflammatory that uses collagen to bind cells to build connective tissues – beneficial to gum tissues. Vitamin C has even been shown to increase bone regrowth, helping to restore healthy teeth.

Want to get your C the natural way? Good sources of vitamin C are coconut water, citrus fruits, broccoli, red peppers, brussel sprouts and tomatoes.

If you aren’t getting sufficient vitamin C through your diet, look for non-acidic alternatives available over-the-counter. These forms of vitamin C come in powder or chewing gum. We prefer you avoid most chewable vitamin C products, however, since they can be highly acidic. This level of acidity can damage tooth enamel, leaving you susceptible to decay.

Keeping your gums healthy is not only necessary for maintaining good oral health. Studies now show that the bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream through tears in gum tissues. As it travels throughout the body, it can trigger inflammatory reactions. This has been linked to heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, some cancers, preterm babies, diabetes, arthritis and impotency.

Signs of gum disease are tender gums that bleed when brushing, swollen gums, gums that deepen in color, receded gums and persistent bad breath. Gum disease will only worsen without treatment and is the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss.

Keeping your mouth healthy means you enjoy fresher breath and helps you avoid periodontal (gum) disease and cavities. In addition to a healthy, balanced diet and vitamin supplements, your 6-month dental cleanings and exams give you added support.

If you have symptoms of gum disease, call promptly so treatment can be scheduled without delay. Or, if you haven’t had regular dental cleanings, call 586-739-2155 to schedule.

Men’s Oral Health Can Impact Sex Life

A study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine revealed that men in their thirties with severe gum disease are 3 times more likely to have erection problems.

This comes after previous research revealed that periodontal disease may be linked to heart disease, which is a common cause of erectile dysfunction. Although there are no claims that one disease causes the other, the association is thought to be related to inflammation brought on by gum disease bacteria.

These findings are valid reasons that men should take an active role in the health of their teeth and gums before other areas of the body are affected. The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention estimates that nearly half of American adults have periodontal disease. Of that, over 56% of men have periodontal disease, compared to just over 38% of women.

Periodontal health has also been associated with other areas of men’s health, including prostate health, heart disease, impotence and some cancers. For example, research has found that men with a history of gum disease are 14% more likely to develop cancer than men with healthy gums – 49% more likely to develop kidney cancer, 59% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer and 30% more likely to develop a blood cancer.

Men can help to protect their overall health by keeping their oral health at an excellent level. It is especially important to watch for symptoms of gum disease, which include gums that bleed when brushing, sore or swollen spots on gums, persistent bad breath, and gums that are red rather than a healthy pink color.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, call toll free 866-9-Smiles for an examination as soon as possible. Gum disease does not improve without treatment.

Can A Healthy Smile Protect Your Heart?

Bacteria in our bodies is not always a bad thing. For example, certain bacteria in the gut actually enhance the process of digestion and help to keep the digestive system operating efficiently.

However, some bacteria is not good. When too much bacteria invade the body, the immune system becomes overburdened. This is why an untreated cut can become infected.

The body’s natural defense response, white blood cells, aren’t always able to conquer infection at certain levels. This is when your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic – to give the immune system added reinforcements.

Periodontal (gum) disease is an infection in the mouth. This is where oral bacteria have amassed to the point that the immune system cannot manage infectious growth. While gum disease destroys tissues in the mouth and the structures that support teeth, this infectious bacteria doesn’t always stay confined to the mouth.

The bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream through tears in weakened gum tissues. As it travels throughout the body, it can trigger inflammatory reactions elsewhere. Over the years, the bacteria of periodontal disease has been linked to everything from stroke to preterm babies to diabetes.

One of the first correlations between oral bacteria and other serious health problems was found in heart disease. An excellent explanation of how this occurs can be found in Harvard Medical School’s newsletter: Harvard Health Publications.

http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/heart-disease-oral-health

They explain the sequence of events as: “In people with periodontitis (erosion of tissue and bone that support the teeth), chewing and toothbrushing release bacteria into the bloodstream. Several species of bacteria that cause periodontitis have been found in the atherosclerotic plaque in arteries in the heart and elsewhere. This plaque can lead to heart attack.

“Oral bacteria could also harm blood vessels or cause blood clots by releasing toxins that resemble proteins found in artery walls or the bloodstream. The immune system’s response to these toxins could harm vessel walls or make blood clot more easily. It is also possible that inflammation in the mouth revs up inflammation throughout the body, including in the arteries, where it can lead to heart attack and stroke.”

Through numerous studies and years of research, we now know that your oral health is closely related to your overall health. By achieving and maintaining a healthy smile, you’ll be doing your body good!

If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms of gum disease, please know that it will only worsen without treatment. Common signs are: gums that bleed easily when brushing, tender gums, gum recession, frequent bad breath, gums that darken in color from a healthy pink to red, and pus pockets that form near the base of some teeth.

Gum disease is also the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss. And, studies have shown that the loss of natural teeth compromises the digestive process, social confidence and one’s lifespan.

Don’t delay care. Make sure you are current on your twice-a-year dental exams and cleanings and be committed to your at-home oral hygiene regimen. Twice daily brushing and daily flossing is necessary to keep oral bacteria at a manageable level.

Ready for a clean mouth that supports your overall health? Call toll free 1-866-9-Smiles for more information about an examination and cleaning. Or, ask to begin with a no-cost consultation.

Diabetic? Improve Your Health With A Healthy Smile!

Diabetes is defined as “a disorder of the metabolism causing excessive thirst and the production of large amounts of urine.” It is a metabolic disease characterized by the body’s inability to properly secrete or manage insulin. This results in abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Diabetes is a leading cause of death due to vascular complications attributed to the disease.

The prevalence of diabetes has increased dramatically over the past few decades and is expected to triple in the next decade. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared diabetes to be at a pandemic level. A report published by the U.S. National Library of Medicine through the National Institutes of Health states that diabetes is “a growing public health concern and a common chronic metabolic disease worldwide.” 

The most common types of diabetes are type 1 (insulin dependent) and type 2 (non-insulin-dependent). According to the American Diabetes Association, the majority of diabetics suffer from Type 2 diabetes with initial symptoms emerging after age 45. Early indications of this disease are bad breath and bleeding gums.

For those in the medical and scientific field, seeing early signs of diabetes in the form of oral problems is typical even though the general public rarely associates one with the other. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory condition that can trigger inflammation elsewhere in the body. Other inflammatory diseases (such as high blood pressure, arthritis, and coronary artery disease) have been linked to gum disease by numerous research studies.

Not only is periodontal disease said to be the 6th greatest complication of diabetes, research has shown that one tends to trigger the other. Gum disease has been found to occur more frequently and with greater severity in diabetics with poor glycaemic control. Proper management of diabetes for controlled glucose levels has been shown to be helpful in preventing or treating periodontal disease.

Symptoms of gum disease include gums that bleed when brushing, frequent bad breath, gum recession that expose dark tooth root sections) and tender and swollen gums. As gum disease progresses, gums will turn red in color, pus pockets will form at the base of teeth and teeth will loosen. Eventually teeth will need removing.

While it is important for all to be aware of  the signs or gum disease, diabetics, especially, should be as proactive as possible when it comes to their oral health due to their  particular vulnerability to inflammation in the body. For our patients who have diabetes, we advise having a dental check-up every 3-4 months.

If you have diabetes, please arrange a periodontal examination at your earliest convenience. Gum disease will only worsen without treatment. And remember, gum disease is the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss.

Delayed care often results in more treatment time and greater expense. Call toll free 1-866-9-Smiles if you have questions or to begin with a free Consultation to discuss your symptoms and oral health.

Why Healthy Teeth & Gums Improve Overall Health

We’ve all had moments where we wanted to take the easy route to solve a problem. This is especially true when adults feel stressed and money is tight. These circumstances make it hard to ‘stay the course’ when a less costly, ‘quick fix’ solution seems so appealing.

For missing teeth, dentures and partials may seem like such a simple solution. Although these recreate the presence of teeth in the mouth, these do little to improve one’s oral or overall health.

The pressure of dentures or partials on the gums actually contributes to bone loss. Bone loss occurs naturally when tooth roots are no longer present in the jaw bone(s). Bone loss is what causes difficulty eating, embarrassing slips and changes that age facial appearance far beyond one’s actual years.

Although it may seem ‘easier’ to have teeth removed or cheaper to avoid dental visits, the long-term health repercussions will eventually emerge in costly ways — physically, emotionally and monetarily.

When your mouth is healthy, you avoid the expense of dental repairs, including tooth replacement. It requires just minutes each day to keep teeth and gums in good shape through a twice-a-day commitment of brushing, daily flossing and regular dental check-ups.

However, problem after problem and frequent dental visits and associated expenses can be depleting. For those who are contemplating dentures to ‘solve’ their dental problems, here’s my advice: Ask someone who has worn dentures for over ten years, if they could go back in time, would they have made more effort to keep their natural teeth?

At this time, nearly half of all American adults fail to brush twice a day. When you assess the damage to not only your teeth and gums, but your overall health, these few minutes at the sink are the simplest ways to enjoy a healthier YOU! And, research has proven that your oral health affects many other aspects of your overall health.

Research has shown that adults who are missing all of their natural teeth die at an age that is ten years earlier, on average, than those who have their natural teeth. Research also indicates that toothless adults (regardless of whether they wear dentures) have a higher risk of heart disease and diabetes.

One study linked the effects of having fewer teeth and bleeding gums. In the study, cardiovascular (heart) problems, high blood pressure and high cholesterol showed a connection to the number of natural teeth and gum disease.

Poor dental hygiene and bleeding gums contain up to 700 types of bacteria. Through tears in weakened gum tissues, these bacteria are able to penetrate the bloodstream. This bacteria, once bloodborne, can increase the risk for heart attack regardless of how fit and healthy the adult is otherwise.

Studies have also shown that the number of natural teeth one has affects their potential for internal inflammation. A Swedish study of over 15,000 adults showed that, as the number of teeth declined for an adult, the higher the levels were for increased inflammation and conditions that lead to hardening of the arteries.

Along with higher cardiac risk, having few teeth was related to higher levels of cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure and waist circumference. Those with fewer teeth also meant a higher potential for developing diabetes.

It is also important to understand that your gum health is just as important as healthy teeth. Gum disease symptoms are often ignored when “nothing hurts,” including bad breath and tender, bleeding gums. This results in plaque, a sticky film of oral bacteria, on teeth and gums. Once it hardens into calculus (which takes less than two days) the results are the beginning of cavities, gum disease, receded gums and tooth loss.

It’s amazing that the risk of developing heart disease can be reduced by maintaining a healthy mouth. As research continues to reveal correlations between oral health and overall health, our population’s commitment to achieving and keeping a healthy mouth will hopefully increase significantly.

Call us toll free 1-866-9-Smiles to begin a path to achieving a healthy smile and an overall well-being.

How To Spend Less On Dentistry

Like most individuals, our desire is to be proactive with our family’s health. To accomplish this, we stay active, eat healthy and have regular check-ups along with periodic screenings. It simply makes sense to be committed to preventing problems or catch any that do arise at early stages.

Research has shown that your oral health deserves the same commitment you give to maintaining a healthy body. Studies have found links between the bacteria of periodontal (gum) disease and serious problems elsewhere in the body. These include heart disease, stroke, diabetes, arthritis, preterm babies,  impotency and more.

Another reason to maintain a healthy smile is to save money. Yes, by devoting mere minutes a day to your oral hygiene and having dental exams and cleanings every six months, you can prevent many problems from occurring in the first place, saving both time and expense for repairs.MagGlass

Your twice-a-year dental check-ups are opportunities to remove calculus. Calculus (or ‘tartar’), a hardened form of oral bacteria, is the result of plaque that is not removed thoroughly from the mouth each day. Once plaque forms into calculus, it attaches to teeth and can no longer be brushed or flossed away.

Oral bacteria thrive and reproduce in your mouth by eating away at gum tissues. Because they reproduce rapidly, they can easily go from gingivitis (an early stage of gum disease) to periodontal disease, an infection. While gingivitis causes tender gums to bleed when brushing, periodontal disease symptoms are more severe, including persistent bad breath, sore gums that bleed easily, gums that darken in color, receded gums, and pus pockets that form between teeth.

Gum disease is the leading cause of adult tooth loss in the U.S.  However, the potent bacteria can become bloodborne through tears in disease gum tissues, causing problems elsewhere in the body. The bacteria of periodontal disease has been shown to trigger inflammatory reactions that are the origins of the major health problems mentioned prior. And, as research continues, more and more problems are being connected to oral bacteria from gum disease.

Obviously, oral bacteria is highly potent. However, it’s easy to control with twice daily brushing and daily flossing combined with regular dental checkups. For added protection, limit sugary snacks and either swish after eating or chew sugarless gum when brushing is inconvenient. Not only will you help to reduce your risk for cavities and gum problems, you’ll be able to enjoy fresher breath and smiling confidence.

Think about the savings you’ll experience when you don’t need cavities repaired and can avoid gum therapy required to remove deeply-embedded oral bacteria. Begin with a thorough examination and cleaning. This will help to give your mouth a clean slate that will be easy to maintain at home between visits.

To schedule, call 1-866-9-Smiles. We look forward to helping you save money!

Periodontal Disease Connections To Diabetes

The dictionary explains diabetes as “a disorder of the metabolism causing excessive thirst and the production of large amounts of urine.” it is a metabolic disease characterized by the body’s inability to properly secrete or manage insulin. This results in abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Diabetes is considered a leading cause of death due to vascular complications attributed to the disease.

The prevalence of diabetes has increased dramatically over the past few decades and is expected to triple in the next decade. A report published by the U.S. National Library of Medicine through the National Institutes of Health states that diabetes is “a growing public health concern and a common chronic metabolic disease worldwide.” Additionally, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared diabetes to be at a pandemic level.

The most common types of diabetes are type 1 (known as insulin dependent) and type 2 (non-insulin-dependent). Initial indications of this disease are bad breath and bleeding gums. While diabetes affects all ages, it is more common in adults. According to the American Diabetes Association, the majority of diabetics suffer from Type 2 diabetes with initial symptoms emerging after age 45.

Seeing early signs of diabetes in the form of oral problems is not surprising to those in the medical and scientific fields, although the general public rarely associates one with the other. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory condition that can create inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body. Other inflammatory diseases (such as high blood pressure, arthritis, and coronary artery disease) have been correlated to gum disease for decades.

Not only are periodontal diseases said to be the 6th greatest complication of diabetes, research has shown that one triggers the other. Gum disease has been found to be more frequent and severe in patients with diabetes with poor glycaemic control. Proper management of diabetes for controlled glucose levels is helpful in preventing or treating periodontal disease.

Symptoms of gum disease include gums that bleed when brushing, frequent bad breath, gum recession that expose dark tooth root sections) and tender and swollen gums. As gum disease progresses, gums will turn red in color, pus pockets will form at the base of teeth and teeth will loosen. Eventually teeth will need removing.

It is important for any individual to be aware of  these signs. However, diabetics should be as proactive as possible when it comes to their oral health due to their  particular vulnerability to inflammation in the body.

For our diabetic patients, we recommend dental check-ups every 3-4 months. If you have diabetes, please call toll free 1-866-9-Smiles to arrange a periodontal examination at your earliest convenience. During this time, we can assess your oral health and treat existing gum disease.

Early evaluation is advised since gum disease will progress without treatment. Delayed care can result in more treatment time and greater expense. Feel free to call us if you have questions. You may wish to begin with a free Consultation to discuss your health and oral symptoms.

What’s Causing These Dark Areas Over My Teeth?

When the gum tissue that arches a tooth exposes dark sections, what you’re seeing is actually the tooth’s root. This is generally caused by gum recession, which exposes sensitive roots to hot or cold food and beverages as well as tooth brushing.

Even though you may not notice the exposed area at first, the painful jolt you get when eating ice cream or drinking hot tea tends gets your attention immediately! While the pain may be mistaken for a cavity, an examination can quickly determine the true cause.

Gum recession occurs for several reasons, which include:
– Rigorous tooth brushing: Brushing your teeth with a scrubbing motion or using a hard bristle tooth brush can erode tender gum tissue. Also, some abrasive substances, such as baking soda, are too harsh to use for brushing.
– Poor oral hygiene: Without proper brushing and flossing, oral bacteria can build up and form plaque. When not removed on a daily basis, plaque hardens into calculus, a substance that is actually a hardened colony of bacteria. Oral bacteria thrive and reproduce by dining on gum tissue.
– Periodontal (gum) disease: When bacteria accumulate, diseased gum tissues loosen from teeth, exposing tooth roots. As gum disease progresses, gum tissue and the bone that supports teeth can also be damaged and even result in tooth loss.
– Smoking: The chemicals of tobacco are horribly drying to oral tissues. Oral dryness occurs when there is insufficient saliva to wash bacteria out of the mouth. This provides an ideal environment for plaque that destroys gum tissues, leading to gum recession.
– Night-time clenching and grinding: When you clench or grind your teeth while asleep, this places such force on teeth that they can tilt out of  position with the gums eventually releasing their grip from teeth.
– Misaligned teeth: When teeth are not aligned properly, it adds strain to teeth when biting and chewing. This also strains jaw joints, gums and supporting bone. This can lead to recession.

Yes, dark portions of a tooth detract from a smile’s appearance but they also place teeth at higher risk for decay or gum disease. For comfort, appearance and health of the tooth, it is important to remedy the cause and repair the problem before damage requires expensive and time-consuming treatment.

Repairing receded gums can be performed comfortably and quickly by gum recontouring procedures. In many cases, we use a dental laser that ensures a precision line, minimizes bleeding and reduces healing time.

The best time to treat recession is as soon as it is noticed. Call toll free 1-866-9-Smiles to learn more.

Connection Between Oral Bacteria & Prostrate?

Biology 101 taught us that accumulated bacteria could lead to an infection. Plus, it’s pretty obvious when it occurs. We all see a cut or skinned area become red with slight swelling as the body recruits white blood cells to the rescue. These cells are our body’s defense mechanism to battle infection.

However, some infection grows beyond what white blood cells can tackle. For example, imagine a deep gash that goes unwashed and untreated. As bacteria multiply and spread, the task becomes too great for white blood cells to overcome. It is in these cases that a doctor prescribes an antibiotic to give the white blood cells a leg up.

However, some infections in the body can ‘simmer’ without being obvious. This is the case with chronic inflammation. ‘Chronic’ means that the problem is ongoing, a continual issue. That’s easy. But it’s the internal inflammation that isn’t so easy to understand.

A number of studies have found that chronic inflammation can cause disastrous and even deadly reactions in our bodies. Research has determined it can lead to severe health problems, including heart attacks, arthritis, diabetes, some cancers and even Alzheimer’s Disease.  This is the kind of inflammation that, once turned on, can’t turn itself off even when it’s no longer needed as a helpmate to the immune system.

Researchers have recently taken a closer look at periodontal disease, a bacterial infection in the mouth, to determine how this may trigger internal inflammation elsewhere in the body.  As an accumulation of oral bacteria, periodontal disease bacteria thrive on gum tissues, teeth and supporting bones. When oral bacteria overwhelm white blood cells, inflammatory reactions can extend far beyond the mouth.

Decades ago, medical and dental scientists determined that the bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream through tears in weakened gum tissue. Once bloodborne, the bacteria could trigger inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body. The inflammation created by oral bacteria has been linked with coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, arthritis, impotency and preterm babies.

New research now suspects a connection between oral bacteria and Prostatitis, an infection of the prostate. Prostatitis causes a frequent urge to urinate and burning or pain during urination.
Deemed an inflammatory disease, a Urologist may prescribe anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics or medications to lower hormone levels. When urine flow is blocked, the specialist may perform surgery on infected areas of the prostate.

The oral bacteria-Prostatitis connection was noted in a recent study that was conducted by researchers at Case Western University, teaming Case Western’s School of Dental Medicine with Case Medical Center’s Department of Urology & Pathology. The study showed that, by overcoming periodontal disease, the symptoms of Prostatitis could be greatly improved.

Each participant in the study had moderate or severe gum disease. Additionally, all had inflammation of the prostrate gland with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. Some were treated for gum disease as prostrate symptoms and PSA levels were monitored. Others in the study received no treatment for their gum disease. None of the participants received treatment for their prostate conditions during the study.

At one and two month intervals, an overwhelming majority of the men in the study who had  received periodontal therapy for gum disease showed lower PSA levels.

Could these findings help Prostatitis patients achieve better treatment results? More studies are planned. In the meantime, it is pretty telling about the importance of taking excellent care of your oral health. Signs of periodontal disease include tender gums that bleed when brushing, frequent bad breath, receded gums, gums that darken from a healthy pink to red, gums that pull away from teeth and oozing from pockets that form at the base of teeth.

As a dentist, what this clearly shows is the devastating impact of oral bacteria. Although we react quickly to bacterial infections that can be seen, gum disease that is  hidden away in our mouths is no less potent..

Begin with a thorough examination and cleaning. If signs of gum disease are present, recommendations will be made to eliminate this bacterial overload and restore your smile to a healthy state. Call toll free 1-866-9-Smiles.